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unprecedented influence and impact and what comes next. suzy or monday, lisa ling and larry king weigh in. >>> also tonight, our 360 special investigation continues. "killings at the canal: the army tapes." what drove three sergeants to execute four iraqi men? did the army's own rules play a role? were those rules too strict? tonight you can decide for yourself. >>> later, "crime & punishment," a 15-year-old girl fights for her life after being gunned down. her agd attackers? five other teenagers. what is happening to our kids? >>> first you have, oprah winfrey's long good-bye began in the final ten minutes of her show. she will be ending her show in september of 2011. >> after much prayer and months of careful thought, i decided that next season, season 25 will be the last season of the ""oprah winfrey show."" and over the next couple of days, you may hear a lot of speculation in the press about why i am making this decision now. and that will mostly be conjecture. so i wanted you to hear this directly from me. >> winfrey said that 25 years felt like the right time to say good-bye. there
analyst lisa bloom. good to have all of you with us. fran, i want to start with you. now we have the picture proof of them face-to-face with president obama. so there is no question to how far the unchecked access got them. really to the highest level. how does this happen? and what should happen now to both the salahis and the secret service folks on duty that night? >> sure. you know, erica, what happens is once you come to that initial point that tom foreman mentions, that perimeter point where you go through a magnetometer, once you're through there, nobody really checks you again. the presumption if you got inside the perimeter, inside the white house grounds, you've been cleared. so no one would have checked them again. and so they would have come into the white house. they would have gone up stairs. they would have gone to somebody at a social secretary's desk to get a card before you go in for your photograph with the president. oftentimes there is an administrative slipup. there won't be one. someone will write it out for you. the only purpose is to put the picture and n
. >> while at us airways' hub in washington -- >> flight 1825. gate 23. >> reporter: flight attendant lisa scott knows the routine well. what's the secret to staying sane if you're a flight attendant? >> um, yoga. [ laughter ] lots of deep breaths. >> reporter: the airlines anticipate just under 2 million fliers to pass through all the nation's airports today. but the busiest air travel days will be sunday and monday with just over 2 million flyers each day. and 23-year veteran lindwood harris knows what they're thinking. >> they're thinking of that wonderful dinner at grandma's house, their expectations of getting there on time, and most importantly, have their bag arrive with them as well. >> check in early. please plan on arriving at airport two hours ahead. >> reporter: the good news? thanksgiving 2009 looks to be snow and ice-free. >> weather is cooperating, passengers are moving well, and flying's good. >> reporter: you heard the advice there, check in early, and the reason for that is because there are fewer airplanes this year and fewer seats. so, if you miss your plane, if you mis
, the cost of that war will almost certainly climb. now they're looking for ways to pay the bill. and as lisa sylvester reports, that may mean new taxes. >> reporter: congress is proposing a heap of new taxes. a 5.4% health care tax for individuals earning $500,000 a year. a proposed tax on so-called cadillac insurance plans. a quarter percent tax on the wall street tax, and possibly, if the war in afghanistan goes on, a new 5% tax on the rich. >> what we're suggesting is a war surtax, a graduated tax so that we don't devour with that cost, every other priority we have in the economy. >> reporter: president obama is also prepared to let the bush tax cuts expire in january 2011 for those making more than $250,000 a year. >> one of his concerns is to more evenly -- is to use tax policy to make a more even distribution. >> reporter: high income earners in some states could see their marginal tax rate increase more than 60%. a democratic representative who has opposed a wall street tax sees nothing wrong with getting the rich to pitch in more. taxpayers helped stabilize wall street and now wall s
lady laura bush and lisa caputo, they were both involved in the planning of state dinners and tell us why tonight's event is so important and also politically for the white house. >> can't believe the guests are stealing the silverware. >> that's a little tacky. >> take a little glass and put it in your purse. my goodness. >>> a court rules hormone replacement therapy can give a woman breast cancer. why are women taking them? elizabeth cohen looking into the controversy coming up. 45 minutes after the hour. and during the sign then drive event, you can get a cc, jetta, or top safety-rated tiguan for practically just your signature. it's that easy. i can't believe it. [ whoosh! ] [ humming ] [ engine revs ] ♪ [ tires screech ] [ pen scratches ] i can believe it. yep. [ male announcer ] sign then drive is back. hurry in and get legendary volkswagen value for practically just your signature. ♪ right now 1.2 million people are on sprint mobile broadband. 31 are streaming a sales conference from the road. 154 are tracking shipments on a train. 33 are iming on a ferry. and 1300 are secr
investigative correspondent lisa myers has details on that. lisa, it's going to make a lot of people mad. >> it absolutely will, matt. this study found that executives at lehman brothers and bear stearns cashed in big time in the years before their firms impled. and even though they suffered huge losses at the end, their ceo still walked away with hundreds of millions of dollars. critics call it being richly rewarded for failure. it was the early phase of the financial meltdown last year. first, bear stearns was sold t avoid collapse. then lehman brothers went bankrupt. shareholders lost billions and thousands of employees lost jobs. but a new study by experts at harvard law school titled "wages of failure" found thatin 2000, the top five executivest each firm had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and it sold mountains of stock. bear stearns executives cashed out about $1.4 billion. and lehman brothers, $1 billion. >> people whonveste in these companies should feel betrayed. the whole idea of capitalism is that the people provide the capital and the executives take care of it f
. it is 8:25. let's begin with a look at traffic and weather. joe conway is in for lisa baden. >> we have all the shoppers on the road. that is what is keeping the interstate clear. the belt way through silver spring, things are moving well let me tell you about road closures in northwest washington. there is a funeral for abe pollin at the national hebrew congregation. the road closures in the area will be most of the day. >> we see some clearing overhead. we have a sunny morning but limited sunshine today, limited to the morning area because of the clouds that are moving out and they will be replaced by clouds rolling in from the north. temperatures right now are near 40. there is a time lapse of showing the gray skies. it is clearing overhead but there will be more rolling clouds later. the forecast today calls for added clouds later on and that may bring a few sprinkles and maybe some flurries north and west of the metro. the highs will be near 50 but it will not feel like that because of the gusty winds. for the weekend, a lot of sunshine and by sunday, sunny, near 60. >>> will be ri
such an important decision? here to face-off and talk about the politics, democratic strategist lisa menendez and former assistant to president george w. bush, brad blakeman. a lot of republicans could argue, too much time, why is he taking so much time on afghanistan? but why would dick cheney, after his five deferments and all the criticism of him and how he led to war in iraq, why would dick cheney defer to this? >> dick cheney should speak to things he knows about quite well. there were very few republicans that were privy to the top-secret information that dick cheney was. even president obama, as a united states senator, at the time he was running for president, was privy to a lot of the things he made decisions on that turned out to be wrong, like the surge. remember, president obama, as candidate obama, was against the surge and sided with people like harry reid who said our efforts was lost, the war was lost in iraq and he was wrong -- >> but dick cheney said iraq had nuclear weapons, and that was wrong too. >> well, no, dick cheney said -- he did not say iraq had -- >> he said on "m
away with millions. nbc lisa myers is here to talk more about this. critics say they were richly rewarded for failure. is that really true? >> i think that's an understatement, monica. this study by experts at harvard law school is appropriately titled wages of failure. it examined the pay of the top five executives at bear stearns and lehman brothers in the years before their firms imploded and it found that since 2000, the top executives at the two firms had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and it sold mountains of stock. top bear stearns executives cashed out at about $1.4 million and top executives of lehman brothers cashed out about a billion dollars. dripped these during this period they were increasing the firm's leverage and making decisions which later turned out to be catastrophic. >> wow. that is shocking. is there going to be any fallout here? >> well, there really is not a lot that can be done. the stockholders are suing and -- but the ceos say, look. when the companies collapsed, we lost about 900 million dollars worth of stock each, but even counting the
at 9:00 eastern. meanwhile, lisa joyner, you saw her in the clip there. one of the hosts of "find my family." she's here now. good to see you. >> it's great to be here. >> you could see the emotion in your face. this is primal. you've tapped into something here. >> it's a race for the kleenex, bill. it literally is. when i tell these people, you've been sought, we found somebody, we can reconnect you, it's overwhelming. some of these people have been waiting all their life. most of their life to find out who this person is. to meet somebody who looks like them, for the first time. i remember, with ashley's case, she said. i'm polish. she never knew. >> you have no idea. this is so complicated. then, there's the feelings of the adoptive parents, right, as well? you have a personal experience in this, right? >> i have a personal experience. i'm adopted. i had a lovely home. my mother and father are my parents. we're not looking to replace parents. the people who raise you are your parents. what we're looking for is to reconnect and reunite. there's something innate, there's something p
senator lisa gladden. she is smiling more often than not considering the high-stakes of this. here is andy levee on the jury so far. >> it does suggest that positions may be hardening or they have at least reached agreement on the state of the evidence, certain premises in terms of basic principles and that now what's going on is discussion of where this leads. does this lead to guilt? does this lead to innocence? >> reporter: count 1, the felony left count carries a 15 year, $25,000 fine, maximum sentence, so there is some high- stakes here, and once again we have just heard that the judge is asked for attorneys from both sides, so there could be a note. there could be something more. we're going to go back up and find out, and we'll see you again very shortly depending on what it is. >>> mike, thank you. we'll talk to you later. state with us for complete coverage. meafer bubala and a team of reporters are following the case and we'll bring you the verdict as soon as the jury reaches one. >>> two baltimore county schools are on lockdown after a domestic shooting in the area. shots ran ou
members, his 6-year-old cousin seen here, his twin sisters carla and lisa. we're told she was pregnant. and the 76-year-old auaunt. two others were wounded. it happened in jupiter, a south florida townhome to celebrities like michael jordan and burt reynolds. police tell us is suspect may turn up in mission where they say he -- michigan where he had some contact and there is word that he had a lurid family history. according to reports in 1973, one of his aunts murdered her ex-husband and two children. then days later died of a fatal drug overdose. to california now where folks got so fed up with the crime in their neighborhood, they took things in their own hands. patrolling the streets in the nighttime hours, armed with the flashlights and pepper spray and the local police say it made the difference. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more on how one neighborhood fought back. >> it's safe to say the recession has taken everything to a new level. budget shortfalls all around the country have forced many police departments to take drastic action. taking officers off the street,
meltdown walked away with huge payouts while their shareholders were almost losing everything. lisa myers has more on the story. >> reporter: it was the relatively phase of the financial meltdown last year. first bear stearns was sold to avoid collapse. lehman brothers went bankrupt. shareholders lost billions and thousands of employees lost jobs. a new study by experts at harvard law school titled "wages of failure" found that since 2000, the top five executives at each firm had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and sold mountains of stock. bear stearns executives cashed out about $1.4billion, and lehman brothers, $1 billion. >> people who invested in these companies should feel betrayed. the whole idea of capitalism in that the people provide their capital and executives take care of it for us. in this case people provided their capital and the executives took it. >> reporter: the study found when the firms collapsed, both bears ceo lost about $900 million worth of stock, but the study said they still camout well ahead overall. cain walked away with $388 million and fold $541
stearns still walked away with millions. nbc news senior investigator correspondent lisa myers joins us now. >> hi, contessa and melissa. the study found that executives at lehman brothers and bear stearns catshed in big time in the years before their firms imploded. even though they suffered huge losses at the end, their ceos still walked away with hundreds of millions of dollars. critics call it being richly rewarded for failure. it was the early phase of the financial meltdown last year. first bear stearns was sold to avoid collapse. then lehman brothers went bankrupt. shareholders lost billions. and thousands of employees lost jobs. but a new study by experts at harvard law school titled "wages of failure" found that since 2000, the top five executives at each firm had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and had sold mountains of stock. bear stearns executives cashed out about $1.4 billion. and lehman brothers, $1 billion. >> people who invested in these companies should feel betrayed. the whole idea of capitalism is that the people provide the capital, and the executives ta
ready for game day. >> reporter: while at u.s. airways hub in washington, lisa scott knows the routine well. what is the secret to staying sane if you're a flight attendant? >> yoga. lots of deep breaths. >> reporter: the airlines anticipate just under 2 million flyers to pass through all of the nation's airports today. but the busiest air travel days will be sunday and monday, with just over 2 million flyers each day. and 23 year veteran linwood harris know what they are thinking. >> thinking about the wonderful dinner at grandma's house and expectations of getting there on time and having their bag arrive with them as well. >> it's a family obligation. right? >> yeah. yeah! the heartland, going to be fun, going to be great. >> check in for your flight early and plan on arriving at the airport two hours ahead. >> reporter: the good news? thanksgiving 2009 looks to be knows and ice-free. >> weather is cooperating. passengers are moving well and flying is good. >> reporter: and that is what you want to hear, right? flying is good across the country. the key is going to be whether the ic
a new harvard study of risky bank behavior. lisa meyers following this one closely. >>> this study was done by experts at harvard law school and is appropriate titled wages of failure. the top five executives of bear stearns and lehman brothers. it found since 2000, top executives sold mountains of stock. and top bear stearns executives cashed out $1.4 billion, and top executives of lehman about $1 billion. when the companies collapsed, their ceo's lost $9 million worth of stock. and the ceos still came out ahead of the game. and james cayne came out with millions, and investors and employees of the two firms obviously did not do so well. thousands of employees lost jobs and many investors lost everything. and as you know, both men denied wrong doing and said their firms were swept under by a financial tsunami. cayne did apologize to the investors, and the other says he wakes up every night thinking what could i have done differently? >> thank you. we are learning more and more about things we already know. top executives at the bank, winding up at the ban sxk paying themselves out
update. we'll start with lisa. >>> we are watching traffic heading out of town right now. northbound 95 into baltimore and down into the delaware memorial bridge, we seem to be any good shape. i have no trouble to report on 66. the beltway is a good at the wilson bridge. we will take you to a couple of cameras so you know what to expect. first of all, make sure your headlights are on. you can barely see 95 in springfield. let's jump to our camera in maryland where it is stop and go. not too bad on at 28, the toll road, if you are heading out to leesburg. a beautiful ride into the district. the fog is leaving. >> it is. it is pretty dense. upper 40's to low 50's. low-level moisture. there is some stormy nets in the upper great lakes area. nothing major. dusty and cooler for friday and the weekend. >>> abe pollin is being praised for his leadership and his generosity. he died yesterday after a battle with a rare brain disease. he was 85 years old. he was the wizards longest tenured honor. thank you for watching.
-- >> flight 1825. 823. >> reporter: lisa scott knows the routine well. >> what's the secret to staying sane if you're a flight attendant? >> yoga. lots of deep breaths. >> reporter: the airlines anticipate just under 2 million flyers to pass through all the nation's airports today. the busiest air travel days will be sunday and monday with just over 2 million flyers each day and 23-year veteran lynnwood harris knows what they're thinking. >> about that wonderful dinner at grandma's house, expectations of getting there on time and having their bag arrive with them as well. >> it's a family obligation. right? >> yeah. it's going to be fun. the heartland. it's going to be fun. it's going to be great. >> check this in for your flight early. please plan on arriving at the airport two hours ahead. >> reporter: good news, it looks to be snow and ice free. >> weather is cooperating. passengers are moving well and flying is good. >> reporter: all right. you heard that air traffic will be down 4% this holiday over last year. last year was down about 6.5% over the year before. airlines have been takin
're using, how angry they are, whether they're fed up with wall street and the story that lisa myers reported today where ceos made half a billion dollars, it's absurd, with $30 million penthows and $2 million apartments for their maids. people feel beat up, making less and less money, lost jobs, families have lost their jobs. there's no one here in washington that represents their interests. they feel sarah palin is one of them, a normal person, a mom. and if she doesn't get the facts right all the time, it's the media's fault and she's a regular joe and she can't read all the newspapers all the time. they like that about her. they connect that. and i think anybody who studies politics should look at that as a phenomena out there and recognize there's that much anger and disconnect with what's going on in washington that it's not represented, that people that feel like what's going on here is not representative of their thoughts and concern. >> andrew ross sorkin in 2008, ron paul ran. >> yes. >> and a lot of people that felt disconnected from washington got behind him. he always ta
of you at the white house state briefing that i hosted with lisa jackson the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefings we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area for funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to investing in committees to help demaris fanta climate related disease, to slashing greenhouse gas emissions and are owned buildings. this is not an afterthought for my department. this is a key part of our broader health strategy. wore and more we understand that health is not something that happens justin doctors' offices. whether you are healthier not depends on what you eat and drink, what e bright, how you get around and where you live. a world that is heating up and powered by coal-fired plants that filled the sky with harmful greenhouse gas is going to have fewer healthy people then the world that runs on clean renewable energy. that is why even if our plan that was not in jeopardy, even if the energy independence was not crucial toward national security and even if clean energy was not a
be -- you cannot wait one against the other. lisa the four critical issues we believe for breast cancer patients. we have a very large bipartisan group of people that have supported us over the years in many ways. staying in the politics of cancer and the partisan politics are very different. >> who is working on your group on getting more funds for technology? >> ge is going to. >> can you explain that further? >> we need to have in this technology summit to have industry come to the table. we need government to come to the table. we need at this the grooves and private insurers will get it that as technology has benefited almost every possible part of our lives, when you see cell phones that we generate themselves, screening areas in airports -- and convinced that there is a better way for screening. we need market incentives. many companies are interested in detecting all of these. we will be urging them as much as we can to participate in the solution to close technology gaps. >> how much money is going into new detection technology is now? >> i will s list to correct me if i am wro
. there are right now five children of former senators who are serving -- one female, lisa murkowski, and four mills. over the course of history, there have been 45 parings of fathers and mostly sons. guest: i am glad to know that. i remember one special day that chris dodd was sworn in. he was my seatmate. great, great guy. just as he was to take his seat, they move to the chair out of the chamber that he was to sit in, and a move to another chair in the chamber, and he sat down and was announced that he was now occupying the chair of his late father, thomas dodd. the staff had found the chair and located it and i think it is stored somewhere, and they made it available to a crisp. there was a very sentimental moment. host: before we get back to calls, let me ask you this in question, the most momentous vote he cast in your -- you cast in your career? guest: my gosh. there was no so-called declaration of war speech. during that time -- host: first gulf war? guest: the gulf war is one i remember because of the trauma. i think we debated it over the weekend. there were no staff members on the floor.
in america? lisa, go ahead. caller: good morning. i work at a shelter for the homeless. i can tell you that i would say that 90% of the clients are either legal aliens or the legal aliens. -- or the legal -- or illegal aliens. those are most of the people at the food banks. host: we have live picture of a food bank from "the washington times." pensacola, florida. curtis, democratic line. go ahead. caller: first of all, i think you know what i mean, i do not know what the word is. i appreciate c-span putting something relevant on. it concerns the nation. we have lost our humanity. the fact that the food situation, i have a friend of mine that works for a church in the area that averages 200 people to 300 people every week. and they are not deal eagle -- and they are not ill eagle -- and they are not illegals. host: who are the people that come in to the food banks? caller: folks are really hurting. seems like the country is losing our humanity. it is all about money and me and said of all of us. -- money instead of all of us. i wish that all of these die- hard republicans that think war is the
stakeholder briefing i hosted with lisa jackson, the administrator of our environmental protection agency. at that briefing we talked about many of the steps my department is taking in this area from funding research on the health costs of greenhouse gas emissions to investing in communities to help them respond to climate-related disease to slashing greenhouse gas emissions in our own buildings. this is not an afterthought from my department. this is a key part of our broader public health strategy. more and more we understand that health is not something that happens just in doctors' offices. whether you're healthy or not depends on what you eat and drink, what you breathe, how you get around and where you live. a world that's heating up and powered by coal-fired plants that fill the sky with harmful greenhouse gas is going to have fewer healthy people than a world that runs on clean, renewable energy. that's why even if our planet was not in jeopardy, even if energy independence was not crucial to our national security, and even if clean energy was not a huge economic opportunity, redu
understand in nigh country becpuáq of the impunity. even con de lisa rise. even civilian. when i think because of that impunity and everybody think that's not - the body of woman sa place where they can do anything they want. it's also to men, to be to get involved in such fight to end it. >> if you just tuned in. this is chouchou namegabe and she's the recipient of the night international journalism report on her work covering the rape and a buts of women in her country. there's an e-mail. is there an appeal by elders for an end to the violence? >> sorry. yes. they want it and need it. that's why in our proposition. we're training women to follow what we are doing to get involved in the fighting and i've got a program of training for women you know in our part that don't have a really good school for our children. i have - this means we're own trainers and we train ourselves by practicing and having many trainings everywhere. that's how i wanted to share the same thing with other ladies. other young women and to elders. yes. they are aware of the situation and they get involved. >>
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)

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